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Producer Profiles

CONACADO - Coordinadora Nacional Cacaocultores Dominicanos

Confederación Nacional de Cacaocultores Dominicanos, or CONACADO, is one of the island country’s top three cocoa producing and exporting entities. Around 85 percent of cocoa grown by CONACADO’s members is certified organic, and most is grown under the shade of canopy fruit-producing trees.

Founded in 1988 as a response to low global cocoa prices, CONACADO aims to decrease members' dependency on middlemen by exporting their products directly to consumer markets.

CONACADO is a democratically-run cooperative
made up of 182 small-scale producer associations from seven regional “blocks” and an estimated 10,040 farmer members, each working on lands averaging 4.3 hectares, or 10.6 acres, in size.

Fair Trade market sales have enabled CONACADO to set up a nursery that supplies low-cost plants to farmers, so they can grow most of their own food. Cocoa accounts for 90 percent of CONACADO's members’ cash income, so becoming Fair Trade Certified™ has made a significant difference in farmers’ lives.

The cooperative also implements a “Cocoa Tour” ecotourism program which teaches international visitors about cocoa farming and the impact of Fair Trade. Farmers are trained as tour guides and members of the cooperative’s Women’s Community Group also help with this project. Other women from cocoa-growing families have started small businesses making cocoa wine, jams, bakery goods, chocolate truffles and community crafts which are displayed and sold from a nearby artisan hut. The chocolates and truffle equipment were funded by USAID, the rest by the Fair Trade premium.


Ramón Figueroa is a CONACADO member. He has seven children, now adults between the ages of 22 and 32. They have all been able to attend and finish school, with one eventually becoming a professor. Ramón did not have the opportunity to complete his education, but is thankful to have provided one for all his children.  

Ramon Figueroa

With the income from Fair Trade we were able to implement a fermentation program to improve the quality of our cocoa and convert our production to certified organic. This improved our position in the Fair Trade market which is very important for the survival of our associates.  

Isidoro de la Rosa

My family hasn’t personally benefitted from the Fair Trade premium-funded projects, no, but how many farmers from my association have now been able to send their kids to school? Several. And when I talk about benefits, a benefit is not something I receive for myself or something I can put in my pockets. A benefit is something our entire community receives. They did not renovate my house because I did not have this need and I thank God for this. For me, if programs benefit someone in need, it represents a benefit for the entire community, and this includes me.  

Santo Moreno


Health Programs

The cooperative invested in a rural health care center when a community’s clinic failed to meet the community’s basic health needs. They also provided free medical assistance and informational sessions on STDs.

Transportation Infrastructure Maintenance

CONACADO used Fair Trade funds for road and bridge maintenance.

Water Aqueduct for Community

In the communities of Rincon Hondo, La Laguna de Coto and La Guazarita, more than 300 families benefited from the installation of a water aqueduct. Before, women here had to walk several kilometers to the river to fetch their water. With six groups of about 20 and 30 workers from these communities, working daily for five months, hammering the roads by hand and walking three hours to river, the water aqueduct was completed.